The Aftermath Of HB116 And The GOP State Convention

Yes, a day late and dollar short would well describe this post but I’ve been busy and it’s always nice to be busy.  Actually, I’m still busy so this will be short.

First, the obvious: HB116 still remains bad law and must still be repealed.  The convention vote indicates progress but the bill is still in effect.  Here are the two main observations on the Utah Republicans supporting the repeal of HB116 at their convention:

1.  Some serious political heavyweights and lobbyists (including one Washington DC elite K Street lobbying firm) were expending serious money and time to influence delegates to vote against the repeal.  As I have previously stated in my post defending the neighborhood caucus system, these elites and big money contributors saw their ability to influence political outcomes seriously diluted.  They ended up losing to a generally more factually engaged group responding to the serious problems within the legislation and the procedural shenanigans thereof.  Basically, the ‘unwashed masses’ defeated big, organized special interests by electing their neighbors to represent them.

2. On the national level, the vote will help to alleviate questions of the LDS Church influence on a Mitt Romney or Jon Huntsman Jr presidency.  Most of the delegates voting to strongly urge the repeal of the flawed bill endorsed by the LDS Church public affairs branch were members of that very church.  Church pressure included press releases, a bill signing attendance, and even resorting to race-baiting the issue in a last ditch, cryptic press release.  Either candidate can point to this event as evidence of member’s ability to act independently of church requests…assuming no punitive actions are taken against members opposed to the bill.  Given the church’s involvement in the political issue, neither candidate will escape the questioning, but they now have a nice, fresh data point to use.

For all posts on HB116, click here.

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